Behind The Scenes

A procession of mannequins in long couture gowns stand atop four large, low, steel platforms lining the center of Medieval Art Galleries at The Met Fifth Avenue.

New Project Stuns at The Costume Institute: Heavenly Bodies

In mid-December of 2017, we received a call from an associate at one of the most lauded architecture firms in the nation. Little did we know that five months and 48 tons of steel and concrete later, our work would be at the center of the most talked about exhibition in the country.

Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination is the Metropolitan Museum of Art Costume Institute’s spring 2018 exhibition and happens to be its largest to-date, taking place across 27 galleries in two locations, The Met Fifth Avenue and The Met Cloisters.

Designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro with The Met’s Design Department, the exhibition examines fashion’s ongoing engagement with the devotional practices and traditions of Catholicism by presenting objects from The Met’s collection alongside papal robes and accessories from the Sistine Chapel sacristy, many of which have never been seen outside the Vatican. Contemporary couture items are presented throughout The Met’s Fifth Avenue galleries and The Met Cloisters.

A project of this scale and ambition occurring within such a compressed time frame requires intense cooperation, communication, and organization. Thousands of details and modifications were exchanged, registered, and conveyed in a timely fashion in order to execute and install the myriad components in the right configurations. But just as importantly, New Project was able to work directly with DS+R to translate the firm’s architectural concepts and language into three-dimensional form, ensuring that the vision was executed as conceived while adhering to museum safety standards.

Because of the tight fabrication window, we communicated edits and comments with the team in a 3-D software environment, rather than passing 2-D construction set drawings back and forth.  And we collaborated with the designers and engineers to ensure the delicate balance between stability of the displays and management of stress loads was maintained.  With that much steel and concrete, we had to be extra cautious that floor loads were dispersed and that all displays passed the engineers’ load tests.

We ultimately fabricated and installed more than 150 individual platforms, pedestals, cases, and custom mannequin mounts based on DS+R’s exhibition vocabulary of straight lines, subtle cruciform shapes, and a muted, industrial palette. We constructed two enormous custom structures: a 40-foot cantilevered wall of acrylic and steel and a 28-foot long glass and steel table to display papal vestments. Upon installation, we worked in concert with the museum’s preparators, conservators, and registrars who precisely placed each priceless artifact and couture piece.

While building and installing large exhibitions is standard operating procedure for New Project, the inclusion of centuries old artifacts and liturgical vestments from the Vatican combined with a celebrity-studded opening covered in every major new outlet the world over made this exhibition unlike any other.

Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination is on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art Fifth Avenue and The Cloisters from May 10 through October 8, 2018.

All in process and install photos by New Project, museum installation photos by Brett Beyer.

 


Matt, Brian, and Grace ensuring precision welds on the 28-foot table installed in the Ground Floor galleries of the Costume Institute.


Constructing the 28-foot long table that will house two papal copes.


The team from DS+R inspects the initial platform prototype in the shop.


The first set of welded frames for the exhibition cases is completed!


Matt welds one of the cruciform supports for the mannequin displays.


Frank and Carlos assemble a mannequin pedestal, placing the concrete housing over the interior steel support.


Casey, James, Willen, Aaron, Chris, and Frank close the cantilevered acrylic and steel case displaying papal vestments in the Anna Wintour Costume Center.


Frank and James installing cases for the Vatican loans on view in the Carl and Iris Barrel Apfel Gallery in the Anna Wintour Costume Center.


Ethan, Frank, Carlos, and Casey installing cases in the Glass Gallery at The Cloisters.


Daniel and Carlos plant trees and rake very clean gravel for the Garden of Eden-themed fashions at The Cloisters.


The team instals an epic 32-foot case around multiple columns to house 8 mannequins in the Pontaut Chapter House at The Cloisters.


Papal vestments displayed in the cantilevered wall we built with custom steel table containing papal copes in the foreground, cassock of John Paul II in the background on view in the Lizzie and John Tisch Gallery in the Anna Wintour Costume Center.


Dolce and Gabbana clad mannequins stand sentry atop our pedestals in the Byzantine Galleries at The Met Fifth Avenue.


Mannequins in 1980’s British Goth couture on pedestals, plinths, and vitrines in the Gothic Chapel at The Cloisters.


The famous 1967 Balenciaga single-seam wedding dress on a custom platform in the Fuentidueña Chapel at The Cloisters.

 

 

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Silver Clouds in window of CK flagship store seen from Madison Avenue

New Project Recreates Combo Calvin Klein-Andy Warhol Silver Clouds

It was announced last year that Calvin Klein had entered into a four-year agreement with The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts that will allow the fashion company to license Warhol’s art across its collections and activations. The agreement offers Calvin Klein’s Chief Creative Officer Raf Simons access to the full breadth of Warhol’s creations—including never-before-published works.

New Project was tapped to execute the latest iteration of Calvin Klein’s partnership with the Foundation: Warhol’s Silver Clouds reimagined by Simons as a site-specific installation for the 654 Madison Avenue flagship.

The silver Mylar balloons were printed with images used in the Spring 2018 CALVIN KLEIN 205W39NYC runway collection (including some from the Death and Disaster series as well as portraits of Warhol pals Dennis Hopper and Sandra Brant). Special fans were painted to match the bright yellow interior scaffolding and installed to ensure the balloons, filled with an exacting measure of helium and air, floated through the space just as they did in Warhol’s Factory and Leo Castelli Gallery decades ago.

New Project undertook several tests, both in the shop and in the store under the cloak of night, to determine the specific mixture needed to fill the balloons, to observe their behavior, and to add features to the space to tune the air flow patterns.

The installation has been a huge success, bringing smiles to patrons who freely interact with the floating works of art. Be sure to catch it while you can—like all things pop, the installation is fleeting. On view at 654 Madison Avenue through February 28, 2018.

After figuring out how to direct the air flow, we customized an armada of fans.

And poles and fixtures.

We inflated and tested the balloons in the shop office first.

Once the Silver Clouds were installed, the store was transformed.

But a lot of adjustments went into the process to make sure the balloons behaved as we wanted. Check out this time lapse video of the overnight test to see what the balloons do when they think we aren’t watching!

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Think & Brew

It’s been a couple of years, but over the holidays we dusted off the home brew equipment and jumped back into one of our favorite hobbies: custom beer fabrication. Head brewmaster Patrick Barth directed the operations which entailed a batch of Four Seasons Pale Ale followed by an Extra Special Bitter. Thanks to our friends at Bitter & Esters, we used some primo ingredients to ensure our brew would be extra tasty.

After a slightly messy but fun mashing and boiling process, we let the beer ferment for a couple of weeks and monitored it carefully. Another entertaining session of bottling and capping followed to set up the conditioning process which allows the beer to naturally carbonate. Two weeks later, we had some pretty tasty brew on our hands (and in our mugs). The process and the results were so much fun that we’re ready to start on our next batch. If you’ve got a suggestion or want to come by for a taste test, let us know!

image of beer making ingredients

We started with quality ingredients: dry malt extract, malt extract, grains, and hops.

Pouring dry malt extract into boiling pot of wort

Patrick adds the dry malt extract to make the wort.

Measuring temperature of the wort while the grains steep in the pot

We monitor the temperature carefully to ensure the wort doesn’t boil.

Image of open bag of dried, green hops to be added to the wort

Mmmm! Fresh, delicious hops!

Dennis smelling bag of open hops

Dennis inspects the hops. Smells like beer…or something.

Patrick pouring hot wort into container to be cooled

Patrick transfers the wort to be cooled and strained.

Beer is poured into a 5 gallon glass jug for fermentation

The cooled wort is transferred to the vessel where it will ferment for a couple of weeks as the yeast does its magic.

Patrick measuring alcohol by volume with beer with tube device

Patrick measures the ABV level in the first batch. Looks good!

Beer in 5 gallon jug is transferred to bucket with spigot for bottling

The beer is transferred from the fermenting vessel to the bucket for easy bottling.

Dan fills a bottle from the spigot

Dan bottles the flat beer so that it can condition and naturally carbonate.

Corinne uses cap crimping tool in the bottling process

Corinne caps and seals with the handy crimper.

Image of a dozen bottles with orange beer caps in a cardboard case

The first case!

Image of two bottles with custom New Project labels

The finished product. Thanks to Thiago for the label design.

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New Project Official Housewarming

On Friday, June 9, we officially christened the shop with a fantastic open house party. It was a perfect evening and we’d like to thank all of our friends, family, clients, and colleagues for helping us inaugurate our new space. We were fortunate to have perfect weather and an auspicious strawberry moon to accompany the celebration.

Kimchi Taco Truck pulled up to the delivery entrance on 24th Street and dished out killer tacos and wings. DJ Econ dropped beats all night to set the friendly and festive vibe. And with so many former employees, neighbors, and clients in the house, it felt like a bit of a reunion. We were excited to show everyone around our new expanded shop which allowed plenty of room for the adults to connect and for the rug rats to go wild.

If you weren’t able to join us but would still like to visit the shop, please drop us a line and we’ll set it up. And be sure to watch for news of the net party. This one was so fun we’re already planning the next one!

The shop is looking good!
The calm before the storm

Dennis and Friends
CEO Dennis Potami greeting Ali Joulalee and family in the office

DJ Econ and Kelly
New Project’s Ethan Eunson-Conn, aka DJ Econ, sharing trade secrets with Kelly Forsyth

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CEO Patrick Barth visiting with Owen, one of the many candidates for cutest kid in the shop

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New Project alumnus Dave Stanfill and family stopped by to say hi to Ade Sanya and the rest of the crew

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Lee Gillespie, another New Project alum, and his super cutester, Zeno

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New Project’s CNC master Jay Clement and his little fabricator, Cooper

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Dean Markosian and David Levy from the AMNH Exhibitions team chat with New Project’s Kelly Forsyth and Aaron Freed

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Savannah Wyatt, New Project superstar James Marsella, and Dennis checking out the party action

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Jason Hughes and Jon Herron talking metal, tacos, and more

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Dennis and Doug Moore debate the merits of red cups

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DJ Econ and DJ Ella dropping beats

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Dennis and Eric Zamore posing for the paparazzi

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The end of a beautiful evening

To see more pics, please visit the New Project Facebook event page.

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Space Exploration: United Nations

Every tourist knows about The Met and MoMA, but New York is filled with many museums and exhibition venues off the beaten trail. In this series, we explore some of the city’s less well known cultural spaces and meet the people who organize them.

UN Exhibits

Within the United Nations Headquarters exists not only an incredible collection of permanent art and gifts given to the UN by member states, but also space in the Visitors’ Lobby which features changing exhibitions. These shows are dedicated to spreading awareness of key topics that the UN’s work addresses such as climate change, violence against women, and human rights. Additionally, there is an online gallery featuring information about current and past exhibitions.

We visited with Melissa Budinic whose office is responsible for exhibits open to the public at the UN.

New Project: Where are the UN exhibits located and how can one visit them?

Melissa Budinic: There are three “galleries” managed by the UN Exhibits office. Located in the United Nations Headquarters Visitors’ Lobby (1st Avenue at 46th Street in New York City), two exhibit spaces are located straight ahead of the entrance toward the left and the third space is located along the curved wall leading to the tour check in area.

Admission to the galleries and public areas is free with government-issued photo ID and open Monday-Friday 9:30 am – 4:30 pm, Saturday-Sunday: 10:00 am – 4:30 pm (closed weekends January and February).

NP: Who organizes the shows and what are they about?

MB: Exhibitions are either developed internally at the UN or by outside entities/individuals. The exhibition proposals are reviewed by the Exhibits Committee. Shows must be educational, offer information on key issues relating to the work of the UN, and be endorsed by a relevant office within the UN (for example, an exhibition on child labor might be sponsored by UNICEF). Past exhibitions have revolved around topics such as the international campaign to ban land mines, ecological and economic importance of healthy oceans, and the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals.

NP: How often do they change?

MB: Exhibitions are usually on view for one to two months. We may have one, two, or three shows on view simultaneously, in addition to an ongoing exhibition about the history and renovation of the UN Headquarters in another space. We present approximately 15-20 exhibitions each year in the Visitors’ Lobby, many of which are also included on the website for those who can’t make it to New York to see them in person.

NP: Do you have any favorites?

MB: Not really. Each exhibit is about a different topic, so every time I get to learn something different about the kinds of work that the UN does.

NP: Can anyone submit at proposal for a show?

MB: Certainly, as long as they follow the guidelines.  The UN doesn’t present art and solo exhibitions. The shows must cover several countries. For details, please send an email to exhibitscommittee@un.org

NP: What’s up next?

MB: In January, we’ll be presenting an exhibition called State of Deception: The Power of Nazi Propaganda. The exhibition is organized by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and coincides with International Holocaust Remembrance Day on January 27. The exhibition is on view starting January 12, 2017.

NP: Thank you for sharing your time!

To learn about more interesting things to see and do while visiting the United Nations (like eating in the delegates dining room, taking a guided tour, and getting a special UN passport stamp), check out the UN website.

UN Exhibits entrance text

The exhibition Palestinian Embroidery: Threads of Continuity, Identity and Empowerment included stunning examples of elaborate embroidery by Palestinian women from the 19th through 21st centuries, photography, dolls, and dresses by contemporary Palestinian fashion designers.

Palestinian Embroidery

Exhibition image detail

UN Exhibits: Palestinian Embroidery 1

Intricate textiles

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Contemporary fashion faces a row of portraits of the UN Secretaries General in rug form donated by member state Iran.

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Installation view of Millennium Villages Project (MVP) – A photographic essay on sustainable development. This exhibition featured photographs of four projects implemented by the Millennium Villages in Ethiopia, Ghana, Rwanda, and Senegal. Led by Professor Jeffrey Sachs, the Millennium Villages Project contributed to eliminating extreme poverty in ten African countries over ten years (2005-2015).

Gift from Thailand

A gift by member state Thailand to the United Nations, one of many remarkable pieces of the collection on view at the UN Headquarters.

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On the Road to Menlo

Eight years ago, New Project collaborated with the artist and avid cyclist David Byrne on a series of 9 bike racks he designed for the New York City Department of Transportation. The temporary public art pieces were created at the time to spur more interest in biking in the city. Each powder-coated steel bike rack was sited in a location that related to its design: a dollar sign on Wall Street, a woman’s shoe in front of Bergdorf Goodman, an abstract sculptural form in front of MoMA.

8 years later, David conceived of a new set of bike racks to be installed in Menlo Park, CA near Silicon Valley in conjunction with his exhibition at PACE Gallery. Fortunately for us, he once again reached out to New Project to collaborate. We worked with the artist to execute five site-specific designs including a pointing finger, a cloud, a rocket, an infinity shape, and the @ symbol.

David came by the studio last week and we asked him a few questions about the project.

New Project: We understand you were inspired by your role as a juror for the New York City Department of Transportation’s 2008 CityRacks Design Competition to create your own bike rack designs. How did you arrive at the designs for the first round of racks that New Project fabricated?

David Byrne: Yes, the city held a competition for bike rack designs and I wasn’t submitting my designs (mine would be difficult to mass produce) but as a fun item to amuse the DOT (Dept. of Transportation) and increase awareness. I sketched out imaginary racks for specific neighborhoods. Pace (David’s gallery) saw them and suggested we actually make them….and with Scanga (Bill Scanga of Pace Gallery) we began to knock around ideas with New Project about how that could be done.

NP: What was your experience like working with New Project?

DB: This is going to sound like gushing, but it was so easy and their work is so rigorous and they’re so sensitive to the way we creative types think – perfect.

NP: How did you feel seeing your bike racks across the city?

DB: I LOVED seeing the racks out there – I felt “I’m a physical part of New York City now!”

NP: Are you inspired to make more public art? Would you like to see David Byrne bike racks in other cities, other countries?

DB: I’m very open to the idea – though as mentioned, to do mass produced racks at a reasonable cost they’d be less one of a kind than these….however these draw attention to the need for racks, even if they don’t solve the problem.

NP: How did the 2016 Silicon Valley series come about? 

DB: With a collaborator, I’m doing an immersive installation in a Pace pop up gallery and they thought – hey, how about more bike racks for the Silicon Valley people out here?! Some businesses or Stanford might even buy some. So again I sketched out some ideas that are very specific to that world….

NP: In your 2010 book, Bicycle Diaries, you share your adventures from the perspective of a global urban cyclist and humanist. The advantages of seeing a city from the seat of a bicycle are obvious; how do you think we can convince more people to share your passion?

DB: I think one can’t “convince” people – and doing it because it’s good for you or for the planet isn’t going to convince folks either – but if they try it they may enjoy it…forgive me, this is terrible, but realistic, if a man sees beautiful women passing by on bikes, he may decide it might be something worth trying….if business folks begin to commute on bikes and the city makes it safe, then it lessens the stigma that only scruffy types or hipsters ride bikes.

NP: Where are you and your bike heading next?

DB: I’ve got a loaner during the install in Menlo Park and Palo Alto!

The Institute Presents: NEUROSOCIETY, an immersive theatrical experience co-created by David Byrne and Mala Gaonkar, will be on view October 27, 2017 through March 31, 2017 in Menlo Park, CA.

David Byrne drawings for new bike racks
David Byrne’s concepts for the new bike racks

Scale model of DB bike rack 
Patrick with a scale model

Molly welding up DB's infinity bike rack
Molly welding the infinity rack

Molly setting up, checking the tack welds
Molly checks the tack welds 

DB rack post-grind
Infinity post-grind

After powder coating
After powder coating

DC and team with finished racks

Team David with the bike racks before painting (left to right): Dennis, Aaron, Kelly, Molly, David, Patrick, Ethan, Fielding

 

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A New Sculpture in Stamford

After talking to several metal shops, Louis Gesualdi decided he needed someone special to fabricate a large steel sculpture for one of his clients. The president of Stamford, CT-based Gesualdi Construction reached out to New Project after checking out our website and finding precisely what he was looking for. Gesualdi was working on Synchrony Financial’s corporate headquarters in Stamford, CT where the firm had engaged artist William C. Seepaul Jr. to create a large sculpture for its corporate campus. Seepaul had translated the consumer financial services company’s minimalist logo into three dimensions, enlivening it with a dynamic ribbon spiraling around bright yellow columns.

When asked about the design, Seepaul stated, “the idea was to create a sculpture that would embody the philosophy of what Synchrony Financial represents. The ribbon is an element that I introduced to illustrate movement. The rising form shows the upward path, an ever moving body that can adapt, yet remain strong, hence the material (steel). The ribbon is a visual representation of musical notation, symphonic harmony, elegance and balance that can be as subtle and simple as it is complex.”

The work, entitled Symphony, was Seepaul’s first large-scale public sculpture. “The mere fact that this sculpture was to be installed in a public place meant that a highly-skilled team of fabricators had to translate the engineering plans and make a tangible, beautiful, and sound piece,” said Seepaul. “There were over 25 sections to the ribbon that had multiplanar curves that had to be painstakingly welded by New Project.  This was in addition to New Project fabricating the columns, and the support lattice as well as finishing, prep, and painting then ultimately installing. Excellent work!”

Gesualdi Construction gave New Project approximately 4 months to translate Seepaul’s watercolor renderings and engineering drawings into a full-fledged steel sculpture to be installed at a June ceremony on Synchrony Financial’s corporate campus. After the steel was precisely cut, the pieces comprising the ribbon were rolled into shape and the entire sculpture was assembled, welded, and painted. We then transported the 17-foot tall sculpture to the site where, over the course of two days, we bolted the piece to its concrete foundation, welded the spiral segment to the sculpture’s columns, and made final surface touch ups to ensure a pristine finish.

Louis Gesualdi was pleased with the results. “It’s fantastic! It came out better than great!” the contractor stated when asked how the piece was ultimately received. In addition to the final fabrication of the sculpture, Gesualdi was responsible for the redesign and rebranding of three large building on Synchrony’s campus, juggling multiple details in a fast-paced environment. Having worked with artists before, Gesualdi had previously overseen the fabrication of outdoor sculpture, although nothing quite as challenging as Symphony. “Everyone was exhaling, glad that it all went well,” remarked Gesualdi.

Symphony sculpture rendering by Artist William Seepaul Jr.

Rendering of Symphony sculpture by artist William Seepaul Jr.

I-beams are welded in the shop to form the base for the sculpture.

I-beams are welded to create the sculpture’s base.

Brett welds from his perch in the shop.

Brett welds the sculpture from his perch.

The sculpture is primed in the shop before being painted.

The sculpture is primed before painting.

The spiral is test-fitted on to the columns before all components are welded together.

The spiral is test-fitted to before welding the components together.

Careful measurements are made to perfectly align the spiral components.

Meticulous measurements are made to ensure perfect alignment of the spiral segments.

Kelly grinding the weld to give a clean edge to the spiral.

Kelly grinds the welds to give the spiral a clean edge.

The sculpture is crated for protection after receiving its final coat of paint.

The columns are crated to protect the finish after painting.

Pino supervises as the sculpture is loaded onto the truck.

Pino supervises as the sculpture is loaded onto the truck.

The sculpture is crated and ready for transport to Stamford for installation.

The sculpture is loaded and ready for transport to its permanent home in Stamford.

Brett ensures the welds are perfect as the sculpture is installed on site in Stamford.

Brett touches up the welds during installation.

SYMPHONY-0034 image by W Seepaul

The final installation and a pristine finish. Photo by William Seepaul Jr.

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Checking in with Designer Scott Henderson

 

Scott Henderson is a Brooklyn-based designer, founder of design studio Scott Henderson, Inc., and co-founder of the design collective MINT. Scott’s work—from housewares to consumer electronics to furniture—has been shown in numerous exhibitions such as the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum’s National Design Triennial and is featured in more than 350 retailers and museums around the world. His work has also been included in The New York Times Magazine, I.D. Magazine’s Annual Design Review, and other prestigious publications.

Henderson’s Slat Chair, above, was prototyped by New Project and debuted at the ICFF in 2011. With ICFF returning to the Javits Center in 2 weeks, we decided to check in with Scott to see what he’s been up to lately.

NP:  You’ve designed all sorts of products—from thermometers to furniture to yachts.  What would be your dream design job?

SH:  It would be fun to do something really big—like be on a team to figure out how to harness ocean waves to convert them into energy, or something like that.  How about a huge terrarium that creates drinking water in arid developing countries?

NP:  That does sound huge!  Since you’re all about the “big idea,” what “big ideas” do you see changing or reshaping your industry?

SH:  The Digital Revolution.  Even though that kind of design work is different from my kind of design, the trend is all about the decimation of the physical.  The biggest taxi company owns no taxis (Uber), the biggest movie house has no cinemas (Netflix), the biggest accommodations provider owns no real estate (Airbnb).  There are also fewer real stores to buy things in, so instead of seeing and touching a real product, you are buying it based on an online thumbnail image.  It’s hard to tell if a design is good or not with only that level of detail, so it makes sense that the importance of [physical] design is therefore diminished, and price competition once again becomes the sole driver of sales. This has reshaped my industry recently in that design now has to offer only what people deem as essential.  Millennials don’t want things—they actually hate stuff.  The age of the design knickknack is dead, and talking about emotion in design is yesterday’s pitch. Design now has to be about the essential. The trend is a return to problem solving and meaningful innovation.

NP:  You run your own successful design studio and have developed your own brands, create your own artwork, have served as chairman of IDSA’s national conference…how do you make time to stay inspired and continue to generate new ideas?

SH:  After a while it just becomes a part of who you are and no longer a job.   As I tell my clients, Scott Henderson Inc. never closes.

NP:  Does your design work come from a solitary or a collaborative process? Or a little of both? How do you like to work?

SH:  A little of both.  I involve my clients as my core team members.  Or if I am doing a “Scott” product, I’ll reach out to buyers and consumers.  I’m a sponge for input—I am always listening and watching. I even sleep with one eye open.

NP: Can you tell us what you’re working on now?

SH:  I’m developing new “Scott” products: a consumer electronics gizmo, some cookware, and some baby gear.

You can see more of Scott’s work on his website here.
And look for him out and about during ICFF and NYCxDESIGN events.

Scott Henderson’s Slat Chair, designed using the forces of tension and compression, was fabricated from molded aircraft grade birch veneer and two simple polished stainless steel rods. Check out the images below to see how New Project created the prototype of Scott’s chair in our shop.

SlatChair_Dennis
Dennis contemplates the tension

SlatChair_seat
Ivar shaping the seat

SlatChair_Scott
Tom threading the slats

SlatChair_assembly
Ivar assembling the pieces

SlatChair_finished
Voila–the final product!

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Calvin Klein window display

CALVIN KLEIN TOPOGRAPHICAL WINDOW DISPLAYS

We just completed another inspired window display for Calvin Klein’s flagship store on Madison Avenue. (You may recall our past windows with them including faux clay walls and 20th anniversary celebration display.) Their concept was to create a topographical landscape for their apparel to live in. Inspiration came from desert landscapes of the southwest. To create the models, we incorporated data from actual maps, tweaked it to fit the given spaces and product considerations, and generated cut files for our CNC machine. When all was said and done, there were over 800 discrete pieces with their edges totaling over a mile in length. Then came coloring; three colors dispersed somewhat randomly amongst all the levels. Needless to say, our diligence in labeling every last piece was absolutely essential for ease of assembly.

Check it out if you’re in Manhattan. Madison Ave and 60th street.

Canyon inspirationCanyons for inspirationCK Topo shapeVisual inspiration provided to us by Calvin Klein

 

CktopoMapA 2-D photo of our 3-D Digital Model

 

pat1Lee, Jody and Willen labeling pieces

 

pat2Jody labeling layers

 

CKtopofab2Sam & Lee beginning to assemble pieces

 

pat3Lee, Sam & Ben finishing up assembly

 

CK topo7Almost complete

 

CK topo2One of the finished windows

 

CK topo1Another finished window

think & build

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MaxMara Boom Boom Room Whitney

THE WHITNEY MUSEUM OPENS TO THE PUBLIC

May 1st marked the long anticipated public opening of the new Whitney Museum of American Art in Manhattan’s Meatpacking District. The museum and its 21,000 works now call 99 Gansevoort Street its new permanent home. The building, designed by famed Italian architect Renzo Piano, includes approximately 50,000 square feet of indoor exhibit space and an additional 13,000 square feet of outdoor exhibit space. Its strong asymmetrical shape mirrors the industrial character of the neighboring buildings and stands prominently on the island’s west side overlooking the High Line.

To celebrate the Museum’s opening, the institution teamed up with the Renzo Piano Design Workshop and Italian design house Max Mara to design a beautiful custom handbag inspired by the new structure.

We have worked with a number of luxury fashion brands to create memorable and cohesive window and store displays throughout the city. Having worked with Max Mara before, we were approached by the London-based company Chameleon Visual, who have been producing distinctive visual concepts for the finest brands for years, to build and install a number of custom pieces for the launch of the Whitney Bag. On the docket: pedestals, cases, vinyl, large-scale lightboxes, neon signs, walls, after-hours installs, and three large-scale models of the Museum. No Problem!


 

Boom Boom Room- Top of The Standard Hotel Private View Party

Our Role: Fabrication and installation of one enclosed display case, and three large-scale models of the New Whitney Museum of American Art. The models, made of medium-density fiberboard (MDF) & Dibond composite, were cut using the CNC machine with v-grooves allowing it to fold into shape. The models were then primed and sprayed with the building’s signature bluish-grey hue.

New Project Whitney Replica

Jody works on the Whitney Museum models in the shop under a heat lamp to seal the primer

 

New Project, Whitney Replica

Frank works on the construction of the Whitney Museum models

 

Boom Boom Room Install

Frank directs the installation of the models and vitrine in the Boom Boom Room overlooking the Whitney Museum 

 

Whitney Bag

Our models alongside the Whitney Bag, overlooking the new Whitney Museum of American Art

 

Detail- Whitney Model

Each angle of the models were precisely cut to mirror Piano’s unique design of the new Whitney Museum 


 

MaxMara Madison Avenue– Whitney Bag Launch

Our Role: Fabrication and installation of lightboxes, neon signs, and bases to display the different style options of the Whitney Bag. This late-night installation took a large crew to finish, and we think the end result is pretty striking.

Max Mara Madison Ave Whiteny Bag

Pat overseeing the installation of the neon MaxMara sign

 

Max Mara Madison Ave Neon Install

Bart & Ben putting on the finishing touches

 

Max Mara Madison Avenue

Dressing the windows at MaxMara Madison Avenue in NYC

 

MaxMara Madison Avenue

Placing the glass over the Whitney Bag

 

Max Mara Storefront

MaxMara Madison Avenue Storefront

 

Madison_Avenue_MaxMara1

MaxMara Madison Avenue Whitney Bag Launch


 

MaxMara: Saks, 5th Avenue Whitney Bag Launch

Our Role: Fabrication and installation of three separate displays in Saks, 5th Avenue.

MaxMara Saks

James loads the vitrines into Saks, 5th Avenue

 

MaxMara Saks

Frank and Kelly set up one of the three displays throughout the store

 

MaxMara Saks

Vinyl application

 

1504_Saks_022_web

MaxMara Whitney Bag Display #1 in Saks, 5th Avenue

 

MaxMara Saks

MaxMara Whitney Bag Display #2 in Saks, 5th Avenue

 

MaxMara Saks

MaxMara Whitney Bag Display #3 in Saks, 5th Avenue


 

MaxMara: Bergdorf Goodman Whitney Bag Launch

Our Role: Fabrication and installation

Whitney Bag- Bergdorf Goodman

Bart places the plexi on the custom vitrine which will showcase the Whitney Bag inside Bergdorf Goodman’s NYC location

 

Whitney Bag- Bergdorf Goodman

The final exhibit inside Bergdorf Goodman’s NYC location.

 

Whitney Bag- Bergdorf Goodman

simple & elegant

 

Credits:

Creative: Chameleon Visual
Production: New Project
Photography: Melvyn Vincent

think & build

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