Exhibits

New Project Heads to London for Bloomberg LP

In late October, Bloomberg L.P. unveiled its new European headquarters designed by Foster + Partners and a special installation by New Project. The 3.2 acre London site includes numerous commissioned artworks and an exhibit designed by Studio Joseph about the legendary Bloomberg Terminal’s history. New Project worked closely with Principal Wendy Evans Joseph and Associate Connie Wu to realize their design which complemented the aesthetic of the building while capturing the unique, forward-looking identity of Bloomberg.

The display took the form of three interlocking and one stand-alone Möbius strip-like shapes made of aluminum and fiberglass to support embedded terminals and educational information. Studio Joseph’s impressive design for the individual components cantilevered eight feet from a single point requiring New Project to employ our engineering as well as fabrication know-how.

In July, Studio Joseph provided New Project with a 3-D model of the finished display from which we created design engineering drawings for production. The substrate was 5-axis milled from 3-pound EPS foam and fitted around a laser cut aluminum structure. The forms were glassed with carbon fiber, fiberglass, and epoxy resin, then coated with a satin automotive finish. After the Bruce Mau-designed graphics were applied, another clear coat was applied for protection. The terminal supports were fabricated out of steel and then powder coated. From end to end, the entire installation measured almost 24 feet long by 20 feet wide.

Once the fabrication was complete, we built custom crates and oversaw the shipping to London where we installed the display while the finishing touches to the building were still being undertaken.  We completed the entire project in under 3 months, including overseas shipping and installation. The end result was a stunning interactive display that invited people to learn about the technology that revolutionized an industry and laid the foundation for a billion-dollar business.

Design drawings for one component of Mobius installation

Milled foam readied for aluminum support structures

Laser cut aluminum support structures

Matt welds the supports to the steel base

 

Frank fits the support into the foam

Dustin preps the fiberglass forms

After the forms are painted and graphics applied, Frank and team build custom crates to ensure safe passage to London

Chris’s view of the installation process from above

 

 

 

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Space Exploration: United Nations

Every tourist knows about The Met and MoMA, but New York is filled with many museums and exhibition venues off the beaten trail. In this series, we explore some of the city’s less well known cultural spaces and meet the people who organize them.

UN Exhibits

Within the United Nations Headquarters exists not only an incredible collection of permanent art and gifts given to the UN by member states, but also space in the Visitors’ Lobby which features changing exhibitions. These shows are dedicated to spreading awareness of key topics that the UN’s work addresses such as climate change, violence against women, and human rights. Additionally, there is an online gallery featuring information about current and past exhibitions.

We visited with Melissa Budinic whose office is responsible for exhibits open to the public at the UN.

New Project: Where are the UN exhibits located and how can one visit them?

Melissa Budinic: There are three “galleries” managed by the UN Exhibits office. Located in the United Nations Headquarters Visitors’ Lobby (1st Avenue at 46th Street in New York City), two exhibit spaces are located straight ahead of the entrance toward the left and the third space is located along the curved wall leading to the tour check in area.

Admission to the galleries and public areas is free with government-issued photo ID and open Monday-Friday 9:30 am – 4:30 pm, Saturday-Sunday: 10:00 am – 4:30 pm (closed weekends January and February).

NP: Who organizes the shows and what are they about?

MB: Exhibitions are either developed internally at the UN or by outside entities/individuals. The exhibition proposals are reviewed by the Exhibits Committee. Shows must be educational, offer information on key issues relating to the work of the UN, and be endorsed by a relevant office within the UN (for example, an exhibition on child labor might be sponsored by UNICEF). Past exhibitions have revolved around topics such as the international campaign to ban land mines, ecological and economic importance of healthy oceans, and the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals.

NP: How often do they change?

MB: Exhibitions are usually on view for one to two months. We may have one, two, or three shows on view simultaneously, in addition to an ongoing exhibition about the history and renovation of the UN Headquarters in another space. We present approximately 15-20 exhibitions each year in the Visitors’ Lobby, many of which are also included on the website for those who can’t make it to New York to see them in person.

NP: Do you have any favorites?

MB: Not really. Each exhibit is about a different topic, so every time I get to learn something different about the kinds of work that the UN does.

NP: Can anyone submit at proposal for a show?

MB: Certainly, as long as they follow the guidelines.  The UN doesn’t present art and solo exhibitions. The shows must cover several countries. For details, please send an email to exhibitscommittee@un.org

NP: What’s up next?

MB: In January, we’ll be presenting an exhibition called State of Deception: The Power of Nazi Propaganda. The exhibition is organized by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and coincides with International Holocaust Remembrance Day on January 27. The exhibition is on view starting January 12, 2017.

NP: Thank you for sharing your time!

To learn about more interesting things to see and do while visiting the United Nations (like eating in the delegates dining room, taking a guided tour, and getting a special UN passport stamp), check out the UN website.

UN Exhibits entrance text

The exhibition Palestinian Embroidery: Threads of Continuity, Identity and Empowerment included stunning examples of elaborate embroidery by Palestinian women from the 19th through 21st centuries, photography, dolls, and dresses by contemporary Palestinian fashion designers.

Palestinian Embroidery

Exhibition image detail

UN Exhibits: Palestinian Embroidery 1

Intricate textiles

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Contemporary fashion faces a row of portraits of the UN Secretaries General in rug form donated by member state Iran.

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Installation view of Millennium Villages Project (MVP) – A photographic essay on sustainable development. This exhibition featured photographs of four projects implemented by the Millennium Villages in Ethiopia, Ghana, Rwanda, and Senegal. Led by Professor Jeffrey Sachs, the Millennium Villages Project contributed to eliminating extreme poverty in ten African countries over ten years (2005-2015).

Gift from Thailand

A gift by member state Thailand to the United Nations, one of many remarkable pieces of the collection on view at the UN Headquarters.

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My Very Eccentric Mom Joyfully Sells Unique Ninjas at PS163Q

In 2013, artist Nanna Debois Buhl received a commission through the Public Art for Public Schools program to create a work of art for a new addition to a high school in Flushing, Queens. Nanna and her consultant, Nathalie Pozzi, reached out to New Project for assistance with the fabrication of the sculptural installation.

After visiting the school, Nanna created a proposal for a model of our solar system combined with a collection of mnemonic phrases written by students from the school. Both components were to be made out of steel with a bright, red, glossy, powder coated finish.

New Project worked with the artist, her consultant, the NYC School Construction Authority, engineers, and the general contractors to ensure the work would be fabricated and installed as the artist envisioned as the school addition was being built.

We spoke to Nanna about The Planets, her new installation at PS 163Q in Flushing, NY.

NP: How did this project come about? When did it start?

NDB: The project began in spring of 2013, when I was invited to participate in a competition for a public commission for PS163Q initiated by the NYC Department of Education, NYC School Construction Authority, and the NYC Department of Cultural Affairs Percent for Art Program.

I made a site visit to get an understanding of the school, its profile, and its architecture. My proposal was an installation for the school’s lobby consisting of a model of the solar system and a collection of phrases, written by students from the school, for remembering the order of the planets in the solar system (planetary mnemonics).

Over the last three years, the work has been developed in collaboration with New Project (fabrication), Nathalie Pozzi (artist’s consultant) and Anni’s (graphic design).

Have you done other public commissions or works in schools?

Yes, Journey to the End of the Night (2010) is a public commission I have made for a high school in Denmark. It covers the four walls of the school’s canteen. Cut out on wooden wall panels, the motif is a map of the position of the stars over the high school on the opening day in 2010. The star formations are accompanied with titles, which are places – from literature, film, music, art, philosophy, and science; works that the students may encounter during their time at the school.

My public commission Atlas of Anatomy (2013) is created for an educational institution in Denmark that houses nursing, teaching, physiotherapy, social education, and social work programs. Silkscreened on 3,000 square feet of inner glass walls, the work consists of 15 photographs of body parts of people in different ages and a cut-up text composed of 133 medical, philosophical, and literary quotes about the body. Many of the quotes were culled from the library of the institution whose educational programs, to a large degree, deal with various aspects of the human body. I think of the commission as an abstract interpretation of the historical anatomical reference book, a journey through a collective body composed of many bodies and voices.

You mentioned that these mnemonic texts (acronyms which take the initial letter of each list item to create a memorable phrase) were created by the students. How did you get them to participate?

I was in dialog with the (now former) principal who gathered a group of students who were interested in participating. I gave them the guidelines for constructing the sentences which they then wrote.

Were you surprised by the responses you received? Do you have any favorites?

It was so exciting receiving the texts from the students. I love the fact that they have used language that I would never have come up with: Nutella Sandwiches and Ninjas, and names such as Mei and Ming – representative of the demographics of the school, which has many Mandarin speaking students.

What other surprises did you encounter in the design process?

The typographic aspect of the work was developed in collaboration with Denmark-based graphic designer Anni’s. We decided to work with the format of the writing exercise book and to think of the two walls where the texts are placed as pages in an open book. The letters of the mnemonics were placed on lines alluding to the exercise book format (and making the installation process more simple). At the end of the last text block there are some empty lines – a built in invitation to continue constructing new sentences. The work combines a scientific model (the solar system) and the imaginative universes of the children (the texts). I think of the model as a motor in a machine that can continue producing texts. And I see the students’ texts as a kind of conceptual poetry (constraint-based writing).

The work invites students to interact with it, to come up with their own mnemonics. Does all of your work entail collaboration or a back and forth of sorts?

Conversations (that be with experts in a given field, an art work, or, as here, a group of students) are always an important part of my working process. In the three public commissions I have made for educational institutions, I have invited people to contribute with textual material: For Atlas of Anatomy I made a “call for quotes” and for Journey to the End of the Night a lot of people helped me gather titles. I think of these works as cacophonic and therefore I also like the working process to have a collective aspect.

A big difference between an art work in a white cube setting and in a public commission is that the audience of the latter lives with the work for a long period of time. I, therefore, like to include an element in the public commissions that can unfold or be discovered over time (such as The Planets built in invitation to make up new sentences).

What was the most interesting aspect of working on this project?

Involving the students and receiving their texts. Developing a work for this specific context taking the educational setting and the audience (students and teachers) into account. And seeing the work transform from a 3D model to an actual physical work. After 3 years of preparation and fabrication it was stunning to enter the school lobby last week and see the work installed, finally.

What’s next?

My next project, I Imagined That Things Were Speaking, is a solo show at MSU Museum of Contemporary Art in Zagreb opening in October 2016. It will consist of a show inside the museum and a large projection on the façade of the museum building. All the exhibited works are photographic “readings” of various cityscapes through objects, plants, animals, and architectural components. The exhibition will thus both address a bypassing audience in the street and a museum audience. I am currently thinking a lot about composing the exhibition, so that it can speak to these different viewers with their different attention spans.

To see more of Nanna’s work, visit her website.

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Mnemonic text cut by our CNC machine

Steel planets orbiting in the shop
The planets in the shop before they begin their orbit

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The arms are inspected after welding

Beautiful powder coating!
Planets post powder coating

Artist Nanna Debois Buhl watches as the work is installed
Artist Nanna Debois Buhl watches as the work is installed

Installation in process
In the beginning, there was only Neptune

Lobby view
View of The Planets from the lobby entrance

 

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NYCxDESIGN

NYCxDESIGN Returns May 3 – 17, 2016

The New York City area is home to more than 44,000 practicing designers—a number greater than any other metro area in the US and almost as many as Chicago and LA combined—according to New York City Economic Development Corporation President Maria Torres-Spring. NYCxDESIGN, which takes place May 3 – 17, 2016, is New York City’s official citywide celebration of design.  The annual event, now in its fourth year, features more than 500 events at locations throughout the five boroughs and incorporates 17 different design disciplines including architecture, product design, design thinking, and urban design. From talks with starchitects to design showroom tours to consumer-friendly fairs featuring wares by up and coming designers, NYCxDESIGN offers something for everyone. NewProject is proud to be part of this dynamic, creative community, supporting many of the designers, architects, and artists who will be presenting their work at NYCxDESIGN. We hope to see you at some of these great events. Here are a few of our picks:

Design Noir
Design Noir
May 7 – 20, 2016
7:00 pm – 12:00 am
at Brooklyn Arts Fellowship

Design Noir is a showcase exhibiting new works by Black and Latino designers. Curated by Dave Jones, the exhibit will be free and open to the public with many of the works for sale.

BklynDesigns
Bklyn Designs
May 6 – 8, 2016
Varying hours
at Brooklyn Expo

Founded 13 years ago by the Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce, Bklyn Designs is the borough’s premier design event shining a spotlight on the many talented designers, architects, artists, and artists who reside here. The event features exhibitions, products (shop local!), installations, hands-on demos, a conference program, pop up lounges, as well as food and drinks from Brooklyn’s finest.  $15 for general public, free to the trade.

NYC Design Talks
NYC Design Talks
May 5 – 14, 2016
4:00 – 8:00 pm
at The Cooper Union, Parsons School for Design at The New School, and Fashion Institute of Technology

This robust program includes discussions about design for social impact, the future of fashion employment, cognitive computing, and an evening with Rafael Vinoly and Michael Shvo moderated by Paul Goldberger. Interested in learning about the Hudson Yards project? DDC’s design and construction excellence program? How artists and developers are planning together in Staten Island? Then check out these free talks!

 

For the full calendar of events, visit www.nycxdesign.com.

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New Project attends AAM Conference

AAM CONFERENCE: ATLANTA, GA

We are so excited to get back into the shop after an incredible experience at the 2015 AAM Conference in Atlanta and to begin implementing everything we learned. Time and time again we find ourselves so honored to be a part of the museum industry. This was our fourth time attending the annual conference and this year’s meeting certainly did not disappoint. Between the tremendous amount of lectures, case studies, panel discussion, events, networking opportunities, and the sheer number of creative and inspiring professionals working in and for our institutions, you can’t help but come back feeling inspired.

New Project stayed at the swanky Marriott during the AAM Conference

The Marriott in Atlanta was pretty incredible, just seemed to go on and on.

 

This year’s General Session included a fond farewell to outgoing Alliance President Ford W. Bell. Mr. Bell’s transformative reign as President has included a comprehensive overhaul of its programs and membership structure, a complete organizational re-structuring, and a new focus on advocacy. We are excited to see what incoming President Laura Lott will accomplish during her tenure and want to thank Mr. Bell for his dedication to the museum community.

New Project attends seminars during the AAM Conference

A few of the sessions and lectures we attended while in Atlanta. Outgoing President Ford W. Bell (lower left) bids us all a fond farewell as he steps down at the end of the month.

 

It’s not uncommon to get bussed from the hotel to the convention center and back to the hotel, barely seeing the light of day when you attend conferences. But the AAM Conference plans events to make sure that their attendees get out and see the host city’s museums and institutions. We got to check out the brand new College Football Hall of Fame and the incredible Georgia Aquarium, among other places.

New Project and a Whale Shark at Georgia Aquarium during the AAM Conference

Here’s Pat with a whale shark and few thousand other sea creatures at the Georgia Aquarium

 

New Project at Georgia Aquarium during the AAM Conference

Dennis and Patrick taking in the magic at the Georgia Aquarium

 

It’s wonderful to walk around the Museum Expo to witness firsthand the innovative things people are doing in the museum community, and of course the swag you come home with isn’t so bad either! First Place goes to Available Light (Booth 1031) for their Waterproof Shower Pad and Pen, no more ideas going down the drain! While we settle back in Brooklyn, we look forward to furthering the relationships we built down in Atlanta, and bid this year’s AAM conference adieu!

See you next year!

think & build

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New Project, Marthas Vineyard Art Collection

ART FOR THE PEOPLE- ART IN HOSPITALS

Martha’s Vineyard Hospital’s Permanent Collection 


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Preliminary sketch for a custom pedestal and case for a Stella Waitzkin book sculpture.

Last week, we were approached by a lovely couple who were looking to build an enclosed pedestal and mount for a cast-resin sculpture titled Wedding Book by the late artist, Stella Waitzkin. Assisting collectors in building conservational and practical means of displaying their acquisitions is something we have specialized in since we opened our doors, however, this particular circumstance was something very special.

The couple that came to visit us here in Brooklyn was Edward F. Miller and Monina von Opel, of Martha’s Vineyard. This sculpture is not destined for this family’s own private collection, quite the contrary. Mr. Miller is the Vice Chairman of the board of Trustees at Martha’s Vineyard hospital, the only hospital in Dukes County. For the past three years, Mr. Miller and his wife have dedicated themselves to advancing the hospital’s permanent collection. Placing art in hospitals has been a hot topic as of late, and recent articles by NBC News and The Wall Street Journal have shown a significant increase in awareness of the health benefits art can have on not only the patients, but on their families and caregivers as well. Transforming the traditionally sterile and industrial environment of a hospital can help people heal, as recent scientific research has suggested. So, while this is not necessarily a new concept, the model set in place by Mr. Miller and his colleagues is certainly something to be admired.

Photo: Edward Miller and Monina von Opel, husband and wife team and public faces of the collection. (Photo Courtesy of Martha’s Vineyard Magazine)

Photo: Edward Miller and Monina von Opel
(Photo Courtesy of Martha’s Vineyard Magazine)

This is not art for art’s sake, this collection has been developed and polished with the Hospital’s patients, families, employees, and location in mind. While the collection does not include any million-dollar listings, the Hospital has catalogued over 350 works of art that have all been donated to the institution. That’s right. The Hospital is not reallocating resources for acquisitions that should go towards providing the highest quality of healthcare to its community. In fact, not only is the artwork donated, but you’ll often find Mr. Miller and Mrs. Opel hanging and lighting the artwork themselves in the hallways of the Hospital.

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Photo: The hallways of the Hospital are lined with over 350 pieces that are in some way associated with the Vineyard. (Photo Courtesy of Martha’s Vineyard Magazine)

Having recently undergone a multi-million dollar building renovation, Martha’s Vineyard Hospital had allocated a small budget to purchase and hang some nondescript poster art that you could find in any hospital in any city of the country. But that wasn’t good enough for Mr. Miller and his companions. He wanted the art on the walls to be able to reflect what was happening outside of the walls. In an article for the Martha’s Vineyard Times, Mr. Miller was quoted :

“The hospital’s architects offered us art, but it was all generic. You could be anywhere. And we wanted you to know you were on the Vineyard. We have so many creative people on the Island, we thought it would be a fantastic thing to bring that creativity into what would otherwise be very institutional.”

Martha’s Vineyard is a place that is bursting with creativity, so why not take advantage of that fact and pay tribute to those who call the Vineyard their home and provide respite for those looking for just a glimpse outside the hospital walls. Catalogued and labeled as any proper collection should be; visitors, patients, staff members, and even the general public can be found at any time during the day wandering the hallways of the Hospital admiring the work.

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Photo: “Moonrise/Summer,” oil on linen by Kib Bramhall, outside the intensive care unit waiting room.” Photo by Susan Safford (Photo Courtesy of Martha’s Vineyard Times)

New Project firmly believes in the power of art to evoke emotion, tell a story, engage, and challenge the viewer. Above all though, we believe in arts ability to help heal. If a piece of art can offer someone a moment of peace, encourage someone to get up out of a bed, or provide an escape from a stressful environment, then it is doing its job.

There is a screening process for all donations, and of course they cannot accept every piece into the collection. Visit the Hospital’s website for more information and to view the extensive collection.

think & build

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HAPPY NEW YEAR!!

The Holiday Season in New York City


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NYC’s cultural institutions offer top-quality programming and exhibits around this time of year. Navigating the overwhelming options can be, well, overwhelming. With seven kids under the age of ten and one more on the way in our New Project family, we have some experience finding the best options for meaningful and exciting family time in the city.

If you’ve been following us online for the past month, you’re likely familiar with our latest project at the Museum of Mathematics (MoMath) in NYC, an exhibit titled Robot Swarm. The response has been glowing from visitors of all ages! The museum is open to the public seven days a week from 10am to 5pm, so there’s no excuse to miss it. You’ll find yourself just as immersed and fascinated as your kids, trust us, we always end up tied up in the Enigma Cafe.

Make sure you check out the other exhibits we’ve built for the museum, including the Logo Generator, Formula Morph, Harmony of Spheres, Motionscape, and Sixth Sense while you are there. Kudos go out to our friends and collaborators at MOEY, a Brooklyn based interactive design company we worked in conjunction with on these pieces.

 

LOGO GENERATOR
“Manipulate mathematical symbols symmetrically to create a unique MoMath-style logo” –MoMath

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Logo Generator allows the visitors to create their own MoMath logo.

 

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Here is the Logo Generator in our Brooklyn metal shop before all of the wires, sensors, and electronics were installed.

 

Check out the custom made joystick for the exhibit we built in our shop. (Photo courtesy of MOEY)

Check out the custom made joystick for the exhibit we built in our shop. (Photo courtesy of MOEY)

FORMULA MORPH
“Bring formulas to life by exploring the multitude of unusual three-dimensional surfaces they can create” –MoMath

 

Formula Morph is one of our favorite interactives we have made for the museum.

Formula Morph is one of our favorite interactives we have made for the museum.

 

Brett Kahler, Dennis Potami, Emily Conrad and Joey Stein discuss how the electronics will run through the metal structure.

Brett Kahler, Dennis Potami, Emily Conrad and Joey Stein discuss how the electronics will run through the metal structure.

 

Looking at the guts of Formula Morph.

Looking at the guts of Formula Morph.

 

In case your curious, here is the mathematical formula for a heart.

In case your curious, here is the mathematical formula for a heart.

HARMONY OF SPHERES
“Create a harmonic soundscape using this interactive musical sculpture, which takes its shape from the symmetries of the 12-tone musical scale”  –MoMath
Working on the prototype.

Working on the prototype.

 

Copper baskets were soldered for the inside of each sphere, to create an electrical field for sensing a hand's touch.

Copper baskets were soldered for the inside of each sphere, to create an electrical field for sensing a hand’s touch.

 

Willen Teofilo assembles the armature on the jig.

Willen Teofilo assembles the armature on the jig.

 

The finished project is a centerpiece at MoMath.

The finished project is a centerpiece at MoMath.

MOTIONSCAPE
“Explore the relationship between position, velocity, and acceleration with a full-body movement experience.”  –MoMath
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Motionscape tracking Ella Barth’s position, velocity, and acceleration.

SIXTH SENSE
“Choose six numbers and see how the machine predicted what their sum would be before the first number was even chosen” –MoMath

 

The brass shell pieces before they are assembled.

The brass shell pieces before they are assembled.

 

James Marsella wiring up the Nixie Tubes.

James Marsella wiring up the Nixie Tubes.

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Our entire team here at New Project wishes you and your families a happy holiday season and a beautiful New Year!

Thank you for your support and see you in 2015!

think & build

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Robot Swarm

The Robots Are Coming- Robot Swarm at MoMath

Robot Swarm at the National Museum of Mathematics (MoMath)


 

The Swarm Is Coming: Museum of Mathematics (MoMath) 

The Swarm Is Coming: Museum of Mathematics (MoMath), NYC

 

Robot Swarm is a full-body interactive experience that is based on a hot-topic in the robotics world right now: the mathematics of emergent behavior. Visitors to the Museum of Mathematics (MoMath) will have the opportunity to step into the ring and come foot-to-face with a colony of horseshoe-crab-shaped creatures who will monitor your movement and react based on a series of behavioral commands. Sound fun? IT IS!

The museum is calling Robot Swarm The nation’s most technologically ambitious robotics exhibit ever. Controlled by a touch-screen panel on the outer-edge of the exhibit, visitors choose from five different scenarios (including On Your Marks, Run Away, Swarm, Pursue and Robophobia) which will then provide a set of rules to the robot colony below. Not only will the robots take into account the visitor’s location in order to perform these rules, but they will also use the locations of their neighboring inhabitants to execute their tasks. If you have ever wondered what it felt like to be Godzilla descending upon a city full of fleeing man-made creatures, or have ever had the urge to literally watch lines of computer code come to life before your eyes, then Robot Swarm will certainly not disappoint.

New Project has been fortunate enough to work with MoMath on a number of projects since its inception. Since then, we have served as one of the museum’s primary fabrication and installation companies. Last year, alongside Tim Nissen-MoMath’s Chief of Design, Three Byte Intermedia-a local technology consulting firm, and Knowledge Resources of Basel, Switzerland, we began working on the fabrication and installation of MoMath’s newest interactive exhibit Robot Swarm which will open to the public on Sunday, December 14th.

Beneath your feet, the robots, equipped with unique personalities and characteristics, will react to your every step based on the rules provided to them. Quite frankly, Three-Byte Intermedia and Knowledge Resources have blown our minds with their creations. Stay tuned to our blog when we sit down and chat with Chris Keitel, Principal at Three-Byte Intermedia about the project.

We’ve helped MoMath realize an exhibit that had been on their minds since the museum was first built. New Project helped bring their clean, industrial looking structure to reality to serve as the largest robotic home for coolest colony of robots. The display consists of a pressurized structural steel and glass contained frame that creates the robots playground and their docking and service stations. The overall structure suggests a boxing ring. Once in the ring you’ll be captivated by the uncanny movement of the robots triggering your instinctual desire to either fight or flee. The framing structure sits atop a wood chassis which was all built here at our shop in Brooklyn and then relocated and permanently installed on the lower level of the museum.

 

From left: Tim Nissen- Chief of Design, MoMath, Glen Whitney, Executive Director MoMath, Chris Keitel- Pincipal, Three-Byte Intermedia, and Cindy Lawrence- Co-Executive Director, MoMath.

From left: Tim Nissen- Chief of Design, MoMath, Mike Stengle- Knowledge Resources Group, Glen Whitney, Executive Director MoMath, Chris Keitel- Principal, Three-Byte Intermedia, and Cindy Lawrence- Co-Executive Director, MoMath.

 

Terry working on the wood chassis in our Brooklyn shop

Terry working on the wood chassis in our Brooklyn shop.

 

Brett, our metal fabricator, mounting the custom made ADA compliant handrail.

Brett, our metal fabricator, mounting the custom made ADA compliant handrail.

The swarm of robots are sealed beneath glass so that they and all of their delicate components are protected from visitors and other harmful materials. We had to make sure that the entire structure was built like a reverse vacuum, pushing out all dirt and dust from the museum.

 

Ensuring the vents are clear and the access points are working on site, prior to installing the glass

Frank ensuring the vents are clear and the access points are working on-site, prior to installing the glass floor

 

Perhaps the biggest challenge we faced while installing the exhibit was the lowering and the placement of two large glass panels each weighing in at almost 2,000 lbs. The panels, which would later become the floor of the exhibit, were placed into a storage area at the time of the museum’s construction, as the glass would be too large to be able to fit down the stairwell once the stairs were built. Basically, that gave us one shot to get it right. If they broke, there was no way to replace them.

No pressure guys no pressure.

 

Terry and James carefully maneuvering he glass panels out from storage

Terry and James carefully maneuvering the glass panels out from the museum’s storage.

 

Jody positioning and securing the gantry in order to hoist the glass out of the crates and safely onto the moving dolly.

Jody positioning and securing the gantry in order to hoist the glass out of the crates and safely onto the moving dolly.

 

Dennis, CEO, overseeing the placement of the glass floor

Dennis, CEO of New Project (kneeling), overseeing the placement of the glass floor onto the moving dolly.

 

Luckily, our installation team is amazing and, using custom-made dollies, and gantry that barely fit, and a set of carefully-placed car jacks, the glass panels were lowered into place over a two-night installation without a hitch. As you would expect, Terry was pretty stoked about it.

 

Terry being pretty stoked about it.

Terry celebrating after the first panel was successfully put into place.

 

Once Robot Swarm is open to the public we’ll post videos and photos of the exhibit in use, stay tuned! To experience our creation first-hand, check out Robot Swarm at MoMath, located at 11 East 26th Street in Manhattan. The museum is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

 

New project team putting on the finishing touches.

Part of New Project’s installation team putting on the finishing touches before the exhibit is open to the public.

think and build

 

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Charles Dickens

Exhibit Fabrication- Dickens at the NYPL

Last year we fabricated and installed a show at New York Public Library called “Charles Dickens: The Key to Character.” It was designed by our friend Roger Westerman and consisted of illustrations, original writings, rare translations, and even Dickens’s pocket diary full of code that he used with his mistress.

We just found out…the show won an award!

SEGD (that’s Society for Environmental Graphic Design in case you were wondering) gave the exhibit a Design Merit award.

Here are some photos:

Charles Dickens: The Key to Character" at New York Public Library

“Charles Dickens: The Key to Character” at New York Public Library

Charles Dickens: The Key to Character

A zoetrope.

A zoetrope.

Charles Dickens: The Key to Character

A dress by Prabal Gurung, a contemporary of Dickens. He was inspired by the decayed elegance of Miss Havisham.

A dress by Prabal Gurung, a contemporary of Dickens.

Charles Dickens: The Key to Character

 

 

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Game of Throne : The Exhibit

Game of Thrones: Amsterdam

“Game of Thrones: the Exhibition”, just finished its layover in Amsterdam. This was a large project we designed and fabricated for HBO. We worked in conjunction with Roger Westerman Design, a great exhibition designer here in Brooklyn. Included in the exhibit is an interactive game based on The Battle of Blackwater Bay that Moey, Inc. helped us develop.

Amsterdam was the forth of five stops the exhibit has made. It started its journey in Toronto, then came to New York City. Our crack project manager Terry Glispin then had the pleasure of taking it to São Paulo, Brazil (where he squeaked over to Rio for some surfing). The exhibit’s home in Amsterdam was perhaps the most stunning, considering the venue was a 19th century neo-gothic church!

Check out the stunning placement of The Iron Throne. (All photos courtesy of HBO Netherlands and Game of Thrones).

The Iron Throne in The Posthoornkerk, Amsterdam.

The Iron Throne in The Posthoornkerk, Amsterdam. Game of Thrones

 

Each venue has had various actors from the Game of Thrones series show up. In Amsterdam Liam Cunningham (Davos Seaworth), Maisie Williams (Arya Stark), and The Netherlands’s own Carice van Houten (Melisandre) came to check out the exhibit.

Carice van Houten, Maisie Williams, and Liam Cunningham cutting the opening ribbon. (photo courtesy HBO Netherlands).

Cast from Game of Thrones: Carice van Houten, Maisie Williams, and Liam Cunningham cutting the opening ribbon.

 

Here is Melisandre and Davos testing their archery skills on the interactive game Battle of Blackwater Bay. (Season 2, episode 9, in case you were wondering).

Carice van Houten and Liam Cunningham playing the game Battle of Blackwater Bay. (Photo courtesy of HBO Netherlands).

Cast from Game of Thrones: Carice van Houten and Liam Cunningham playing the game Battle of Blackwater Bay.

 

Here are more great photos of the Game of Thrones exhibition in its Amsterdam home.

The Game of Thrones, The Exhibit in Amsterdam.

The Game of Thrones, The Exhibit in Amsterdam.

The Iron Throne

The Iron Throne. Game of Thrones

Daenerys

Daenerys. Game of Thrones

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The Interactive Game, The Battle of Blackwater Bay.

The Interactive Game, The Battle of Blackwater Bay. Game of Thrones

 

And a little look at the crowd on line for the Game of Thrones Exhibit. Needless to say, it was popular.

Game of Thrones

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